The Dangers of the Internet and Other “Cool” Trends Part II

by KidsSafe on September 7, 2012

Not “Cool” Trends Part I

If you remember in our first article we talked about the seven new teen trends that are emerging as real threats to our kids.

This is a bit of a heavy topic, but I think it is one that really needs to be talked about and that is the dangers not only of what our kids are doing online, but what goes on when they are out with their friends and even at school. Now I am just a normal dad nothing makes me special, but I wanted to share my thoughts with how we can at the very least try to figure out why our kids want to do these self-destructive things and also maybe coming up with ways to stop them doing destructive things.

Who Are My Kids Friends?????

This is huge and one I am very surprised that many parents do not make more of an effort on. Knowing exactly who your kids are hanging out with. While we can tell our kids not to do something until we are blue in the face. Peer pressure from their friends is far more effective than anything we can say. I know that sounds horrible, but sadly it can be true.

Make sure you take the time to at least engage your kids friends in casual conversation or know who their parents are. No kid wants their parents to be talking to their friends, but if they are going out of their way to hide who they are hanging out with or never want to bring them round the house then I certainly would look into it.

 

Elder Siblings Play A Huge Part

I have found from my experiences that elder kids most often siblings are perhaps not on purpose or maliciously, but they are responsible for introducing a younger sibling to some of these what are seen as “cool” trends. Then that kid will then tell their friends about it and that is a huge part of how these trends spread. Of course the internet now makes these things spread even faster.

If you do have siblings, cousins or older kids who are involved in your younger child’s life then make sure you try to let them know they are role models and that they should be looking out for the younger ones. I know it is much easier said than done, but older kids are easier to reason with and can see the dangers in some activities that younger kids cannot. And if the elder child is a bad influence then try to not let them be alone with the younger child. I know in the case of siblings this is very hard.

What Were You Thinking?????

Is there a parent alive who has not at least said this one time to their child? Well for me the response you will get from your child 9/10 will be “I dunno”. Kids will not think of the dangers of any dangerous things they do be it drugs, alcohol or whatever they only see the fun side. It is your job as a parent to be that first line of defence showing them the dangers.

Schools can only do so much, but you need to make sure that by the very least you let them know what some dangers are before they get to middle school.

By the time the school gets round to telling kids what dangers are out there it could be too late. It is your responsibility to make them know why these things are not only they not allowed to partake in, but the dangers of them as well.

 

Who Can Help Us?????

If feel that your child does need help getting out of some bad habits or to stop hanging round with certain people then there is help out there. I find that school should always be the first point of call. Not only can the staff at the school help, but the school will have many different contacts who can really help you out.

Independence

I feel personally as a father that the best way for me to make sure my kids do the right thing when they are out in the real world is to teach them be to strong-willed and independent. I was lucky that my parents made sure that from a young age I made my own decisions and that I knew right from wrong and also not to just be a follower. To use my own mind.

Trying to make sure your kid knows that just because John down the street likes to go planking does not mean they need to in order to be “cool” You may be thinking that this is easier said than done, but I do not mean to sound harsh, but it is not.

It is not as hard if from a young age you are taking the time to really bond with your child and to teach them right from young and more importantly spend time with them so that they know that can come to you if things ever get tough or if they find themselves in situations where they are uneasy or unsure.

Being a kid is really tough perhaps thanks to the internet it is easier to get into trouble than it ever has been before. At the end of the day if you raise your child right then you need to trust them that they are going to make the right decisions, but if things do go wrong that they know they can come to you for help.

Learn About The Top 13 Issues. To Be Better Internet Parents…

1. CyberBullying and/or BullyCide  Click Here
2. Human Trafficking and/or Modern Day Slavery  Click Here
3. SEXting  Click Here
4. Pornography  Click Here
5. Predators and Pedophiles  Click Here
6. The Choking Game  Click Here
7. Internet At Risk Behavior  Click Here
8. Social (Facebook / MySpace / Twitter) Networks  Click Here
9. Dangerous Drugs  Click Here
10. Malware  Click Here
11. Identity Theft  Click Here
12. Identity Monitoring  Click Here
13. Getting HACKED  Click Here

We will be covering all 13 of these topics and online security issues over the next few weeks!!

Please fill out our comments section below to help us help you, make sure you do your own research for your local area organizations & groups who can help or give you advice or personal info… or any thing I can help you with or do research on, note that in your comments :)

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